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Archive for the ‘Vegetarian’ Category

I knew I’d be making this recipe as soon as I saw the bounty of squash we received in our last box. It’s one of my favorites, and I’ve made a few modifications to incorporate some ingredients I had on hand. Fresh squash and baby onions mix with an oregano-parsley pesto, cheese, and brown-butter breadcrumbs to make a dish that’s fresh and decadent. Yum.

Now, as written, this recipe can be time-consuming, but I’m including some suggestions at the bottom to facilitate weeknight cooking.


Summer Squash Gratin (adapted from 101 Cookbooks)

zest of one lemon
2 pounds summer squash or zucchini, thinly sliced
1/2 teaspoon salt
2 baby onions (about 3-4 in. in diameter), thinly sliced

1/4 cup fresh oregano leaves
1/4 cup fresh Italian parsley
1 large garlic clove, chopped
1/4 teaspoon fine grain sea salt
pinch of red pepper flakes
1/2 cup extra-virgin olive oil

1/4 cup unsalted butter
2 cups fresh bread crumbs*
3/4 cup grated Gruyere cheese (or Swiss cheese)

Preheat oven to 400F degrees. Rub a 13×9 baking dish with a bit of olive oil, sprinkle with lemon zest, and set aside.

Place the zucchini slices into a colander placed over a sink, toss with the sea salt and set aside for 10-15 minutes (to drain a bit — this softens them up and makes them cook more quickly) and go on to prepare the pesto and bread crumbs.

Make the pesto by pureeing the oregano, parsley, garlic, 1/4 teaspoon salt, red pepper flakes, and olive oil in a food processor or using a hand blender. Set aside.

Make the breadcrumbs by melting the butter in a small saucepan over medium heat. Cook for about five minutes until the butter is fragrant and has turned brown. It will smell deliciously nutty. Stir the breadcrumbs into the browned butter.

Transfer the squash and onions to a large mixing bowl. Add the oregano pesto. Toss until everything is well coated. Add the cheese and half of the bread crumbs and toss again. Taste one of the zucchini pieces and add more seasoning (salt or red pepper) if needed.

Transfer the squash mixture to the lemon-zested pan, top with the remaining crumbs, and bake for 40 to 50 minutes When the dish is finished, you’ll be able to slide a fork easily into the zucchini.

Serves about 8 as a side.

*To make breadcrumbs, tear bread into pieces the size of your thumb, and pulse in a food processor. I like my breadcrumbs a bit larger than the ones you buy at the store, about the size of small pebbles. You can certainly use store-bought breadcrumbs instead of making your own, but reduce the amount to 1 cup, as these are much finer than homemade ones.

To facilitate weeknight cooking, do the following:

  • Use store-bought pesto instead of making your own. Basil would be good, but I’ve seen a Classico sun-dried tomato pesto that I’d love to try.
  • Slice the squash and onions and grate the cheese the night before.
  • Use store-bought breadcrumbs (see note above).
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I’ve been getting a ton of baby carrots in my box lately, as opposed to full-sized adult carrots. Rather than spend a lot of time chopping them up to use as a base in other dishes, I tossed them together with a few other ingredients to create this sweet, simple side dish.

You can probably leave most of the carrots whole, but cut the larger ones in half lengthwise to ensure that they all cook evenly. Also, when you trim the carrots, you can certainly cut the tops off, but I left them on because I like how they look. I added leftover carrots to my lunch salad the next day.

Maple-Glazed Roast Carrots

1 large bunch of baby carrots, trimmed
1 tbsp olive oil
2 tsp maple syrup
1/4 tsp salt
1/8 tsp black pepper
2 tbsp chopped parsley

Preheat oven to 400 degrees. Combine all ingredients in a large bowl and mix well to coat carrots evenly with syrup. Line a baking sheet with foil and coat with cooking spray. Spread carrots on the sheet, place in oven, and bake 20-25 minutes, stirring once, until carrots are tender. You should be able to slide a fork easily into them. Sprinkle with parsley and serve.

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I love me a good slaw. This one has extra crunch from both jicama and green apples, and a citrusy dressing provides just the right amount of tartness. You can find jicama by the potatoes in the grocery store, and it does kind of look like a russet potato. It has a very mild flavor, so it’s great for recipes like this where you just want something that adds a bit of crunch but doesn’t overpower the dish.

If you have a food processor, this recipe will come together in about 15 minutes. I use mine all the time, and you don’t need to go all Williams Sonoma and spend $500 on one. I’ve used my cheapo Black and Decker for about 10 years with no problems. I couldn’t find a link to mine online (like I said, it’s old) but this one is similar. If you don’t have a food processor, use the large holes on a box grater to shred the veggies.

Anyway, enjoy this slaw with grilled shrimp or grilled bbq tofu kebabs. Or pretty much anything else grilled. Heck, it was so good I just ate a big bowl of it as a snack.

Jicama, Apple, and Cabbage Slaw

2 cups shredded cabbage (I used green, but Napa is fine)
2 Granny Smith apples, peeled, cored, and shredded
1 jicama, shredded (about 12 oz)
2 carrots, shredded
1/2 cup sliced spring onion tops (or green onions)
1 tsp salt
1/2 tsp black pepper
Juice of two oranges (about 1/4 cup)
Juice of two limes (about 4 tbsp)
2 tbsp olive oil

Combine cabbage, apples, jicama, carrots and onion tops in a large bowl. Season with salt and pepper and stir to combine. In a small bowl, combine orange juice, lime juice, and olive oil. Pour over veggies and toss to combine.

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Anyone else get the Whole Foods e-newsletter? It is always full of great recipes and is how I came across this intriguing dish. It’s a vegan main course, stuffed with quinoa and chickpeas for protein, and mushroom and peas as the main veggie content. As I made it, I imagined that this would be something you could find on the menu in a restaurant in The Haight with this song playing in the background.

Anyway, the chickpeas and rolled oats serve as the binders in this loaf, replacing the breadcrumbs and eggs you usually find in meatloaf-like recipes. The original calls for frozen peas, but I got some fresh ones this week and am using them here. Because of that, I recommend blanching them for a few minutes in boiling water before adding them to the mix (frozen peas are already blanched). The Whole Foods site recommends serving leftovers sliced on toasted bread, like a veggie burger. I think that’s going be my lunch tomorrow.

Quinoa Loaf with Mushrooms and Peas (from Whole Foods)

1 tablespoon extra virgin olive oil, plus more for greasing
8 ounces fresh mushrooms, sliced
Salt and ground black pepper to taste
1 (15-ounce) can no-salt-added garbanzo beans, rinsed and drained
3/4 cup rolled oats
2 cups cooked quinoa (how to cook quinoa)
1 cup fresh green peas
1/2 cup chopped fresh parsley and/or 1 tablespoon minced fresh thyme
10 sundried tomatoes packed in oil, drained and chopped
1 cup chopped red onion

Preheat oven to 350°F. Lightly grease an 8-inch loaf pan with oil; set aside. Bring a large saucepan filled with water to boil. Add peas and cook 3 minutes, then remove with a slotted spoon and set aside. (If using frozen peas, you can skip this step.) Heat oil in a large skillet over medium-high heat. Add mushrooms, salt and pepper and cook, stirring occasionally, until mushrooms are golden brown, 6 to 8 minutes.

Meanwhile, put beans, oats and 1/2 cup water into a food processor and pulse until almost smooth. In a large bowl, combine mushrooms, bean mixture, quinoa, peas, parsley, tomatoes, onion, salt and pepper. Transfer mixture to prepared loaf pan, gently pressing down and mounding it in the middle. Bake until firm and golden brown, 1 to 1 1/4 hours. Set aside to let rest for 10 minutes before slicing and serving.

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I love a good roasted beet salad. Usually I just pair the beets with mixed greens, goat cheese, and a balsamic vinaigrette, but as we’ve gotten a lot of beets this season, that particular recipe was getting old.

Enter this salad. I love how the brightness of the cilantro, crunch of the walnuts, and saltiness of the cheese combine with the sweet beets. I’ve adapted this recipe a bit from a Michael Chiarello version that called for a few fairly exotic ingredients such as hazelnuts and hazelnut oil. I’m sure they’d be delightful here, but I’m in my hometown in southeast Texas this weekend, and as there isn’t a Whole Foods for miles, I made do with some substitutions. The salad still tasted great. I also sub frozen pearl onions for the fresh ones, which are a pain to peel.

This salad will come together quickly on a weeknight if you roast and peel the beets Sunday night, then chill until you are ready to use them.

Roasted Beet, Onion, and Orange Salad (adapted from Michael Chiarello)

  • 1 pound beets, quartered (or halved if they are very small)
  • 1 tablespoon extra-virgin olive oil
  • Salt and freshly ground pepper to taste
  • 30 frozen pearl onions, about 1/2 pound
  • 2 oranges, peeled and cut into wedges
  • 2 tablespoons olive oil oil
  • 1 tablespoon coarsely chopped cilantro, plus extra for garnish
  • 1/2 cup orange juice
  • 2 tablespoons walnuts
  • 1 ounce Parmesan cheese, shaved with a vegetable peeler or grated on the large holes of a box grater


Preheat the oven to 400 degrees F.

Cut the stems and tails off the beets. Do not peel. Line the bottom of a baking pan with foil. Place the beets in the pan and toss them with half of the olive oil, salt and pepper. Roast for 25 minutes.

Toss the pearl onions with remaining olive oil and salt and pepper. Add pearl onions to the beets and roast an additional 15 minutes, until beets and onions are tender. You should be able to slide a fork easily in and out of the beets.

Peel and remove the membranes from the oranges with a sharp paring knife. Cut the oranges into chunks. I used navel oranges so I didn’t have to worry about seeds.

Peel and quarter the beets. The easiest way to peel beets is to rub the skins off with your fingers. Sometimes a paper towel can help if some of the skins are stubbornly clinging to the beets.

Combine beets, orange pieces, and onions in a platter/

In a medium bowl, combine the olive oil, cilantro, and orange juice. Whisk until well combined and season with salt and pepper.

Drizzle the dressing on top and sprinkle with cilantro, walnuts, cheese. Serve immediately.

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I love coconut. I mean, really love it. It’s hard for me to keep bags of the sweetened, flaked kind in my pantry because I just want to eat it all in one sitting with a spoon. I even tried putting coconut milk in my coffee once, which was a bad idea and is, to this date, the only coconut experiment I’ve conducted that was really disgusting.

Anyway, I saw that 101 Cookbooks had posted this recipe last week. All I had to read was the title and I was in. Then I saw that it involved lentils and a few other ingredients I had in the fridge from my Greenling box (cilantro, green onions, and a carrot) and I knew I’d found a recipe to make over and over again.

It lived up to its promise. This soup is thick and rich, but still has a hint of brightness from the coconut milk, cilantro, and golden raisins. I used light coconut milk to make it a little healthier, but other than that this is the rare recipe I didn’t really fiddle with. You can skip the curry-toasting step to save time, and cook the lentils and split peas (both found in the bulk bins at Whole Foods) the night before for a meal you can just toss together and simmer. In the original recipe, serving the soup over brown rice is optional, but I highly recommend it because it adds a nice texture.

Coconut Red Lentil Soup (from 101 Cookbooks)

1 cup yellow split peas
1 cup red lentils (masoor dal)
7 cups water
1 medium carrot, cut into 1/2-inch dice
2 tablespoons fresh peeled and minced ginger
2 tablespoons curry powder
2 tablespoons butter or ghee
8 green onions (or green garlic, which showed up in last week’s box), thinly sliced
1/3 cup golden raisins
1/3 cup tomato paste
1 14-ounce can coconut milk
2 teaspoons salt
one handful cilantro, chopped
cooked brown rice, for serving (optional)

Rinse split peas and lentils well. Place them in an extra-large soup pot, cover with the water, and bring to a boil. Reduce heat to a simmer and add the carrot and 1/4 of the ginger. Cover and simmer for about 30 minutes, or until the split peas are soft.

In the meantime, in a small dry skillet or saucepan over low heat, toast the curry powder until it is quite fragrant, about 3-4 minutes. Keep an eye on it, because the powder can burn quickly. Set aside. Place the butter in a pan over medium heat, add half of the green onions, the remaining ginger, and raisins. Saute for two minutes stirring constantly, then add the tomato paste and saute for another minute or two more.

Add the toasted curry powder to the tomato paste mixture, mix well, and then add this to the simmering soup along with the coconut milk and salt. Simmer, uncovered, for 20 minutes or so. The texture should thicken up. Serve over brown rice, sprinkled with cilantro and the remaining green onions.

Serves 6.

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I usually do one of two things when I’m trying to use up a bunch of produce at once: add it to marinara sauce and serve over pasta, or make a stir-fry. I served this one over good old brown rice, but it would be yummy over quinoa, barley, or whatever grain you’re in the mood for. And as for the veggies, use what you have! That’s the beauty of stir-fry. Just make sure all of your veggies are cut to similar sizes and thicknesses (so they cook evenly) and that you have everything cut and ready to go before you start cooking, because this comes together really quickly.

For proteins, mine had baked tofu (cooked last night) and Mason’s had pork from Richardson Farms. I’ve pretty much stopped using tofu right out of the pack. The baked or broiled stuff has a firmer texture and doesn’t break up when you stir it around. I varied the veggies a little in each of our versions based on our preferences, but again, do what you want. Just about any vegetable combo works here.

See those two ramekins of purple carrots (purple on the outside, anyway)? Pretty, and tasty too!

Baked tofu even looks nicer than straight-out-of-the-package tofu. (Oh, and that pink stuff on the cutting board is where some beets stained it a while back. Don’t want you to think I’m a dirty cook.)

Pork mixture cooking in my cast-iron skillet. The nonstick one had my tofu version in it. The cast iron worked fine, but you may need to add extra oil if the food starts to stick.

Tofu Stir-Fry

1/4 cup oyster sauce
1 tbsp toasted sesame oil
1 tbsp mirin
1 cup vegetable broth
1 tsp. minced ginger
1/4 cup sliced shallots
1 tbsp peanut or canola oil
1/2 cup green onions, sliced into 1-in. pieces
1 cup thinly sliced carrots (we got purple ones this week!)
2 cups sliced mushrooms (I used a combo of shiitake and white mushrooms)
1 cup green beans, trimmed and cut into 1-in. pieces
1 lb extra-firm tofu, drained, pressed, and baked (see link above)
2 tsp. cornstarch
Chopped cilantro (optional, but I love it)

Combine first five ingredients in a small bowl and set aside. Heat oil in large nonstick skillet over high heat. Swirl oil around when it gets hot, to coat the pan. Add shallots, green onions, and carrots. Stir fry about 1 minute. Add mushrooms and green beans and cook another 3-4 minutes, until mushrooms soften. Add tofu and oyster sauce mixture. Whisk cornstarch with a little water until the mixture is smooth, and add that to the pot. Reduce heat to medium-high and cook 1-2 minutes, until sauce thickens. Sprinkle with cilantro, if desired, and serve over rice or other grain.

Pork Stir-Fry

1/4 cup oyster sauce
1 tbsp toasted sesame oil
1 tbsp mirin
1 cup chicken broth
1 tsp. minced ginger
1 tbsp peanut or canola oil
1 lb lean pork, cut into 1/2 in. pieces
1/4 cup sliced shallots
1/2 cup green onions, sliced into 1-in. pieces
1 cup thinly sliced carrots
2 cups chopped green bell pepper
1 cup green beans, trimmed and cut into 1-in. pieces
2 tsp. cornstarch
Chopped cilantro (optional, but I love it)

Combine first five ingredients in a small bowl and set aside. Heat oil in large nonstick skillet over high heat. Swirl oil around when it gets hot, to coat the pan. Add pork and cook 3-4 minutes, until browned and almost cooked through. Add shallots, green onions, and carrots. Stir fry about 1 minute. Add bell pepper and green beans and cook another 3-4 minutes, until the peppers start to soften. Add oyster sauce mixture. Whisk cornstarch with a little water until the mixture is smooth, and add that to the pan. Reduce heat to medium-high and cook 1-2 minutes, until sauce thickens. Sprinkle with cilantro, if desired, and serve over rice or other grain.

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