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Posts Tagged ‘cabbage’

I love me a good slaw. This one has extra crunch from both jicama and green apples, and a citrusy dressing provides just the right amount of tartness. You can find jicama by the potatoes in the grocery store, and it does kind of look like a russet potato. It has a very mild flavor, so it’s great for recipes like this where you just want something that adds a bit of crunch but doesn’t overpower the dish.

If you have a food processor, this recipe will come together in about 15 minutes. I use mine all the time, and you don’t need to go all Williams Sonoma and spend $500 on one. I’ve used my cheapo Black and Decker for about 10 years with no problems. I couldn’t find a link to mine online (like I said, it’s old) but this one is similar. If you don’t have a food processor, use the large holes on a box grater to shred the veggies.

Anyway, enjoy this slaw with grilled shrimp or grilled bbq tofu kebabs. Or pretty much anything else grilled. Heck, it was so good I just ate a big bowl of it as a snack.

Jicama, Apple, and Cabbage Slaw

2 cups shredded cabbage (I used green, but Napa is fine)
2 Granny Smith apples, peeled, cored, and shredded
1 jicama, shredded (about 12 oz)
2 carrots, shredded
1/2 cup sliced spring onion tops (or green onions)
1 tsp salt
1/2 tsp black pepper
Juice of two oranges (about 1/4 cup)
Juice of two limes (about 4 tbsp)
2 tbsp olive oil

Combine cabbage, apples, jicama, carrots and onion tops in a large bowl. Season with salt and pepper and stir to combine. In a small bowl, combine orange juice, lime juice, and olive oil. Pour over veggies and toss to combine.

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Just as I thought I was done with cabbage after last week’s huge one, another large Napa cabbage showed up in my Greenling box this week. This one was a runt compared to last week’s, weighing in at only 4 lbs, 7 oz. But that’s still a big veggie.

So, I started an Internet hunt for recipes that use a LOT of cabbage. This scalloped cabbage casserole looked promising so I gave it a shot. After making several tweaks to adjust the flavor (1 tsp of marjoram is a lot) and healthiness (so is 5 tbsp of butter), we had a winner.

Even if you don’t like cabbage, this casserole could win you over. It involves cabbage and carrots parboiled until crisp-tender, combined with a light bechamel sauce, and covered with cheese and breadcrumbs. I promise, at the end, it doesn’t taste anything like that boiled cabbage your parents made you eat on New Year’s Day.

Scalloped Cabbage Casserole

8 cups thinly sliced cabbage (Napa or green)
2 large carrots, shredded
1 medium onion, finely chopped
4 tbsp Smart Balance (or other trans-fat-free butter substitute)
3 tbsp all-purpose flour
1 tsp salt
1/2 tsp black pepper
1 1/2 cups skim milk
1 1/2 cups reduced-fat cheddar cheese (or cheddar cheese blend)
1/2 cup bread crumbs
1 tsp dried thyme
1/2 tsp dried marjoram

Preheat oven to 350 degrees. Meanwhile, bring a large pot of salted water to a boil. Add cabbage and carrots and cook until crisp-tender, about 5 minutes. Drain and set aside.

Melt 2 tbsp of Smart Balance in a skillet on medium-high heat. Add onion and cook until translucent, about 7 minutes. Combine flour, salt, pepper, and milk in a small bowl, whisking until smooth. Add to onion and cook 2-3 minutes, until thick. Remove from heat.

Place half of cabbage mixture in a greased 2-1/2-qt. baking dish. Top with half of the sauce; sprinkle with half of the cheese. Repeat layers. In a small skillet, melt remaining butter. Add crumbs, marjoram and thyme; cook and stir until lightly browned. Sprinkle over casserole.

Bake, uncovered, at 350 degrees F for 30-35 minutes or until the top is browned. Makes 8 servings.

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This recipe started out as the Szechuan-Style Tofu with Peanuts recipe in this month’s Cooking Light. I made several tweaks to use ingredients I had on hand, including my giant cabbage, and to make this vegetarian. The quinoa adds protein, a nutrient I’m always keeping track of because I don’t eat meat. I also loved the method of broiling the tofu, which gave it a great texture.

By the time I was finished with it, it didn’t look much like the original. But it had a bright, Thai-style flavor and a nice crunch from the peanuts. It has a nice punch of heat, too, so if you’re one of those people who thinks ketchup is spicy you’re going to have to cut back a lot on the chili-garlic sauce.

Spicy Tofu Stir-Fry with Peanuts and Quinoa
1 cup quinoa, rinsed well
2 cups water
1 lb extra-firm tofu, drained and pressed
1/2 cup vegetable broth
1 tablespoon chili-garlic sauce
1 tablespoon soy sauce
1 tsp cornstarch
2 tsp black bean sauce
1 tbsp canola oil
1/4 tsp salt
4 oz sliced mushrooms
6 oz Napa cabbage, chopped (it’ll look like a lot, but it cooks down quite a bit)
1 carrot, grated
1 tbsp minced ginger
1/2 cup chopped green onions
1/2 cup chopped cilantro
juice from two limes (about 3 tbsp)
1/4 cup unsalted dry-roasted peanuts, chopped

Bring water to a boil. Add quinoa, cover, and simmer 20 minutes until all water is absorbed. Meanwhile, preheat broiler. Cut tofu into 1-inch cubes, place on a foil-lined baking sheet coated with cooking spray, and broil 15 minutes or so until it’s golden brown.

Combine broth and next four ingredients (through black bean sauce).  Heat oil in a large, nonstick skillet. Add salt, mushrooms, and cabbage and cook 4 minutes, stirring occasionally, until cabbage begins to wilt.

Stir in carrots and ginger and cook 1 minute. Add broth mixture and cook 30 seconds or until sauce thickens.

Remove from heat; stir in onions, cilantro, and lime juice. Sprinkle with peanuts and serve over quinoa.

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