Feeds:
Posts
Comments

Posts Tagged ‘mushrooms’

I’m going to admit to y’all that I did not know you did anything with a brisket besides smoke it until I moved to Austin in 1999. I also didn’t know you could buy one that weighed less than 7 lbs. Where I grew up, brisket = bbq, and that was that.

It took me a long time to come around, but I started coming across recipes for braised or roasted brisket more and more, and finally, this weekend, I bit the bullet and tried it. And you know what? It was still tender and juicy and delicious, albeit with an unusual herb rub giving it quite a different flavor than the smoked brisket I’m used to. I’m recommending a few changes from the original recipe, such as cooking it directly in the roasting pan instead of on a rack (I think it’ll be even juicier this way) and throwing in some mushrooms and carrots that can cook in the juices, like a pot roast. Also, I’m adding crockpot directions for weeknight cooking (and for Hilary, who doesn’t turn on the oven if it’s more than 45 degrees out).

Don’t be afraid of the mint — it’s very subtle. I love the generous amount of herbs used here, because a) they are tasty, and b) I often have a hard time using up all the herbs we get before they go bad, and this is a good way to do so.

Braised Brisket with Parsley, Mint, and Thyme (from Whole Foods)

1 (4-pound) beef brisket, trimmed
Salt and pepper to taste
3/4 cup roughly chopped fresh parsley
1/2 cup roughly chopped fresh mint
2 tablespoons roughly chopped fresh thyme
2 tablespoons red wine vinegar
1/2 teaspoon red pepper flakes
6 cloves garlic
1 cup roughly chopped yellow onion
2 cups low-sodium chicken broth
2 cups sliced mushrooms
1 cup diced carrots

Preheat oven to 350°F and spray a roasting pan with cooking spray. Season brisket all over with salt and pepper and then place in the roasting pan; roast for 1 hour. Meanwhile, put parsley, mint, thyme, vinegar, pepper flakes, garlic, onion, salt and pepper into a food processor and pulse to make a thick paste; set aside.

After 1 hour, remove brisket from oven; reduce oven temperature to 325°F. Carefully add broth to pan, spread herb paste over brisket, arrange mushrooms and carrots around brisket, cover pan with foil and continue roasting, basting every 45 minutes or so, until very tender, about 2.5-3 hours more.

Transfer brisket to a platter; set aside to let rest for 10 minutes. Skim off and discard any fat from liquid in pan. Trim brisket further, if desired, then thinly slice against the grain (here’s how to do that) and spoon pan sauce over the top.

Alternate crock pot directions

Reduce amount of chicken broth to 1 cup. Spray a crock pot with cooking spray or line with a crock pot liner.

Season brisket all over with salt and pepper and then place in the crock pot. Put parsley, mint, thyme, vinegar, pepper flakes, garlic, onion, salt and pepper into a food processor and pulse to make a thick paste; spread over brisket.

Add broth to crock pot, spread herb paste over brisket, and arrange mushrooms and carrots around brisket. Cover and cook on low for 10 hours.

Transfer brisket to a platter; set aside to let rest for 10 minutes. If you want to use the juices as gravy, put them in a saucepan and cook on medium-high heat about 10 minutes, until they reduce a bit and aren’t so watery. Skim off and discard any fat from liquid in pan. Trim brisket further, if desired, then thinly slice against the grain and spoon pan sauce over the top.

Advertisements

Read Full Post »

Anyone else get the Whole Foods e-newsletter? It is always full of great recipes and is how I came across this intriguing dish. It’s a vegan main course, stuffed with quinoa and chickpeas for protein, and mushroom and peas as the main veggie content. As I made it, I imagined that this would be something you could find on the menu in a restaurant in The Haight with this song playing in the background.

Anyway, the chickpeas and rolled oats serve as the binders in this loaf, replacing the breadcrumbs and eggs you usually find in meatloaf-like recipes. The original calls for frozen peas, but I got some fresh ones this week and am using them here. Because of that, I recommend blanching them for a few minutes in boiling water before adding them to the mix (frozen peas are already blanched). The Whole Foods site recommends serving leftovers sliced on toasted bread, like a veggie burger. I think that’s going be my lunch tomorrow.

Quinoa Loaf with Mushrooms and Peas (from Whole Foods)

1 tablespoon extra virgin olive oil, plus more for greasing
8 ounces fresh mushrooms, sliced
Salt and ground black pepper to taste
1 (15-ounce) can no-salt-added garbanzo beans, rinsed and drained
3/4 cup rolled oats
2 cups cooked quinoa (how to cook quinoa)
1 cup fresh green peas
1/2 cup chopped fresh parsley and/or 1 tablespoon minced fresh thyme
10 sundried tomatoes packed in oil, drained and chopped
1 cup chopped red onion

Preheat oven to 350°F. Lightly grease an 8-inch loaf pan with oil; set aside. Bring a large saucepan filled with water to boil. Add peas and cook 3 minutes, then remove with a slotted spoon and set aside. (If using frozen peas, you can skip this step.) Heat oil in a large skillet over medium-high heat. Add mushrooms, salt and pepper and cook, stirring occasionally, until mushrooms are golden brown, 6 to 8 minutes.

Meanwhile, put beans, oats and 1/2 cup water into a food processor and pulse until almost smooth. In a large bowl, combine mushrooms, bean mixture, quinoa, peas, parsley, tomatoes, onion, salt and pepper. Transfer mixture to prepared loaf pan, gently pressing down and mounding it in the middle. Bake until firm and golden brown, 1 to 1 1/4 hours. Set aside to let rest for 10 minutes before slicing and serving.

Read Full Post »

Hilary reminded me today that I haven’t talked much about Ryan lately here. So I’m going to tell you what happened this week when I pulled out a pint of strawberries and offered him one.

He ate it quickly, then asked for more. He then ate another one. And another. And soon, in one sitting, he had eaten an entire pint of strawberries and then started crying when I told him that he’d eaten all the strawberries in the house. Yeah. If you remember, Ryan is not yet two.

Now, yesterday I made chicken nuggets. I’d never even made them at home until last night, when I came across a recipe for chicken nuggets breaded with almond meal instead of breadcrumbs that sounded interesting. They tasted just like regular chicken nuggets, but did Ryan want them? Of course not.

An entire pint of strawberries in one sitting? No problem. But a toddler finger-food staple? Just one bite? Well, that’s just ridiculous.

Tonight we resorted to bribery. It went like this:

Us: “Ryan, if you eat your chicken you can have some cake!”
Ryan: “No!”

Us: “Ryan, if you eat your chicken you can have your orange!”
Ryan: “No!”

And so on. It did not work. So tomorrow night, I’m going to serve this soup and hope for better results. If kiddie-style chicken’s not cutting it, we’ll just go with a more adult chicken dish and see what happens.

There’s much to love about this soup. Inspired by several veggies I needed to use, it’s stuffed with vegetables, chickpeas, and chicken, and gets a wonderful smoky flavor from smoked paprika. It also comes together quickly on a weeknight. It would taste great without the chicken and with vegetable broth for a vegetarian version.

Smoky Chickpea Soup

2 tbsp olive oil
2 cloves garlic, chopped (about 1 tsp)
1 bunch spring onion bulbs, thinly sliced (reserve the tops for garnish)
1 bunch bok choy, chopped
2 cups finely chopped kale
1 cup mushrooms, sliced
3 cooked chicken breasts, chopped (about 3-4 cups)
1 15-oz can chickpeas
1 15-oz can fire-roasted tomatoes
2 cups chicken broth
2 tsp smoked paprika
Salt and pepper to taste

Heat olive oil over medium-high heat in a Dutch oven. Add onions and garlic and cook about 5 minutes, until onions soften. Add remaining ingredients, seasoning with salt and pepper to taste, and bring to a boil. Reduce heat and simmer for 15 minutes, until greens or softened. Garnish with chopped spring onion tops. Serve with crusty bread to soak up the rich broth.

Read Full Post »

We get a batch of juicy strawberries this week –the first of the season! I’m using them in this Spring Strawberry Pie, which gets a unique flavor from a touch of balsamic vinegar. The entire box consists of:

So I’m making:

Spinach and carrot quiche (recipe to come in your Local Box)

Smothered mushrooms and kale

Hearts of palm and red onion salad with citrus vinaigrette (subbing salad greens for the spinach, unless I have some left over from the quiche)

Chinese spring onion pancakes to accompany a beef and bok choy hot pot

Read Full Post »

I usually do one of two things when I’m trying to use up a bunch of produce at once: add it to marinara sauce and serve over pasta, or make a stir-fry. I served this one over good old brown rice, but it would be yummy over quinoa, barley, or whatever grain you’re in the mood for. And as for the veggies, use what you have! That’s the beauty of stir-fry. Just make sure all of your veggies are cut to similar sizes and thicknesses (so they cook evenly) and that you have everything cut and ready to go before you start cooking, because this comes together really quickly.

For proteins, mine had baked tofu (cooked last night) and Mason’s had pork from Richardson Farms. I’ve pretty much stopped using tofu right out of the pack. The baked or broiled stuff has a firmer texture and doesn’t break up when you stir it around. I varied the veggies a little in each of our versions based on our preferences, but again, do what you want. Just about any vegetable combo works here.

See those two ramekins of purple carrots (purple on the outside, anyway)? Pretty, and tasty too!

Baked tofu even looks nicer than straight-out-of-the-package tofu. (Oh, and that pink stuff on the cutting board is where some beets stained it a while back. Don’t want you to think I’m a dirty cook.)

Pork mixture cooking in my cast-iron skillet. The nonstick one had my tofu version in it. The cast iron worked fine, but you may need to add extra oil if the food starts to stick.

Tofu Stir-Fry

1/4 cup oyster sauce
1 tbsp toasted sesame oil
1 tbsp mirin
1 cup vegetable broth
1 tsp. minced ginger
1/4 cup sliced shallots
1 tbsp peanut or canola oil
1/2 cup green onions, sliced into 1-in. pieces
1 cup thinly sliced carrots (we got purple ones this week!)
2 cups sliced mushrooms (I used a combo of shiitake and white mushrooms)
1 cup green beans, trimmed and cut into 1-in. pieces
1 lb extra-firm tofu, drained, pressed, and baked (see link above)
2 tsp. cornstarch
Chopped cilantro (optional, but I love it)

Combine first five ingredients in a small bowl and set aside. Heat oil in large nonstick skillet over high heat. Swirl oil around when it gets hot, to coat the pan. Add shallots, green onions, and carrots. Stir fry about 1 minute. Add mushrooms and green beans and cook another 3-4 minutes, until mushrooms soften. Add tofu and oyster sauce mixture. Whisk cornstarch with a little water until the mixture is smooth, and add that to the pot. Reduce heat to medium-high and cook 1-2 minutes, until sauce thickens. Sprinkle with cilantro, if desired, and serve over rice or other grain.

Pork Stir-Fry

1/4 cup oyster sauce
1 tbsp toasted sesame oil
1 tbsp mirin
1 cup chicken broth
1 tsp. minced ginger
1 tbsp peanut or canola oil
1 lb lean pork, cut into 1/2 in. pieces
1/4 cup sliced shallots
1/2 cup green onions, sliced into 1-in. pieces
1 cup thinly sliced carrots
2 cups chopped green bell pepper
1 cup green beans, trimmed and cut into 1-in. pieces
2 tsp. cornstarch
Chopped cilantro (optional, but I love it)

Combine first five ingredients in a small bowl and set aside. Heat oil in large nonstick skillet over high heat. Swirl oil around when it gets hot, to coat the pan. Add pork and cook 3-4 minutes, until browned and almost cooked through. Add shallots, green onions, and carrots. Stir fry about 1 minute. Add bell pepper and green beans and cook another 3-4 minutes, until the peppers start to soften. Add oyster sauce mixture. Whisk cornstarch with a little water until the mixture is smooth, and add that to the pan. Reduce heat to medium-high and cook 1-2 minutes, until sauce thickens. Sprinkle with cilantro, if desired, and serve over rice or other grain.

Read Full Post »

This recipe started out as the Szechuan-Style Tofu with Peanuts recipe in this month’s Cooking Light. I made several tweaks to use ingredients I had on hand, including my giant cabbage, and to make this vegetarian. The quinoa adds protein, a nutrient I’m always keeping track of because I don’t eat meat. I also loved the method of broiling the tofu, which gave it a great texture.

By the time I was finished with it, it didn’t look much like the original. But it had a bright, Thai-style flavor and a nice crunch from the peanuts. It has a nice punch of heat, too, so if you’re one of those people who thinks ketchup is spicy you’re going to have to cut back a lot on the chili-garlic sauce.

Spicy Tofu Stir-Fry with Peanuts and Quinoa
1 cup quinoa, rinsed well
2 cups water
1 lb extra-firm tofu, drained and pressed
1/2 cup vegetable broth
1 tablespoon chili-garlic sauce
1 tablespoon soy sauce
1 tsp cornstarch
2 tsp black bean sauce
1 tbsp canola oil
1/4 tsp salt
4 oz sliced mushrooms
6 oz Napa cabbage, chopped (it’ll look like a lot, but it cooks down quite a bit)
1 carrot, grated
1 tbsp minced ginger
1/2 cup chopped green onions
1/2 cup chopped cilantro
juice from two limes (about 3 tbsp)
1/4 cup unsalted dry-roasted peanuts, chopped

Bring water to a boil. Add quinoa, cover, and simmer 20 minutes until all water is absorbed. Meanwhile, preheat broiler. Cut tofu into 1-inch cubes, place on a foil-lined baking sheet coated with cooking spray, and broil 15 minutes or so until it’s golden brown.

Combine broth and next four ingredients (through black bean sauce).  Heat oil in a large, nonstick skillet. Add salt, mushrooms, and cabbage and cook 4 minutes, stirring occasionally, until cabbage begins to wilt.

Stir in carrots and ginger and cook 1 minute. Add broth mixture and cook 30 seconds or until sauce thickens.

Remove from heat; stir in onions, cilantro, and lime juice. Sprinkle with peanuts and serve over quinoa.

Read Full Post »

I want to talk about tempeh for a minute. As meat substitutes go, I place it far above tofu. Don’t get me wrong, tofu is fine, but it takes some work to prepare and it’s difficult to get the texture right. Tempeh has a nutty, slightly soft texture, cooks up quickly, and absorbs flavors readily. I’ve also found that people who are hesitant about meat substitutes like it better than tofu. It’s best if you marinate tempeh for about 20-30 minutes before you cook with it, but besides cutting it into pieces, that’s it for prep work.

I had some mushrooms in the fridge from last week’s Greenling box, and when I spotted carrots, green onions, and broccoli in this week’s box I knew I wanted to combine them all in a stir-fry. This one is salty and slightly sweet, and coated with a rich sauce that doesn’t need cornstarch to thicken. In fact, it’s really salty, so if you want to temper the sodium a bit, use low-sodium soy sauce instead of the tamari in the marinade. I served over quinoa.

Tempeh stir-fry with mushrooms, carrots, and broccoli

8-oz package tempeh (I like this brand)
1/4 cup tamari (or soy sauce)
1/4 cup rice vinegar
1 tbsp. toasted sesame oil
2 tbsp. hoisin sauce
1 tbsp. peanut or canola oil
1 cup thinly sliced carrots (1/8 in.)
2 cups sliced mushrooms
1 cup small broccoli florets
1/4 cup sliced green onions (1 in.)
1/8 cup low-sodium soy sauce
1/4 cup black bean sauce
1 in. piece ginger, minced

Dice tempeh into 1/2 in. squares or small, thin triangles. Combine tempeh with tamari, vinegar, sesame oil, and hoisin sauce in a zip-lock bag and marinate in the fridge for 20-30 minutes.

Combine soy sauce, black bean sauce, and minced ginger. Have this sauce and your veggies ready to go, as stir-fries cook quickly.

Heat peanut or canola oil over high heat. When oil starts to sizzle, swirl pan to coat evenly. Add carrots and cook 1 minute, stirring constantly. Add broccoli, mushrooms, and green onions and cook 2 minutes. Add tempeh (including marinade) and soy sauce mixture. Reduce heat to medium high and cook 3-5 more minutes, stirring frequently, until tempeh is heated through and sauce is thick.

Read Full Post »